YOSHIMI / 禎み

Yoshimi banner.jpg

When people ask, "Where are you from?", I always start by saying, "Well, it's complicated..." I'm currently living in Tokyo, but I was born in China and my family is Korean—they are part of the Korean minority in China. If I remember correctly, my ancestors moved to China two or three generations ago from the Korean Peninsula. My parents were living in China, but my dad moved to Japan for his postgraduate degree. When I was born, my grandparents took care of me in China until my dad's student life settled down. I moved to live with my parents in Japan when I was two and a half years old, and I've been living in Tokyo ever since.

It sounds a bit paradoxical, but when I hear the word 'home', I imagine a bird flying in the sky. A bird that has a place to go back to. But by "a place to go back to", I don't mean a specific place, I mean "a person or people I can go back to". People are where you go back to. People you can be yourself with. I can't define home as a place.

The home that I think about has warmth, but I don't think this warmth can be brought about by connections based on ties to a region. For example, for me, visiting my relatives feels more like going on an adventure. Most of my relatives are in China but I don't particularly feel close to them because we can't communicate in the same language. My parents' generation mainly uses Korean rather than Mandarin in daily conversations. I've long forgotten Korean so I can't communicate with my relatives. I can speak Mandarin but my relatives use Korean at gatherings so I'm an outsider. It's almost like I'm an anthropologist, coming into contact with a completely new culture and customs. I make interesting discoveries through these observations.

Neither China nor Japan is my home. I like both countries, but I don't fully belong to either of them. I've always been an outsider in societies that I've lived in, so it's not like I've been able to be myself. But this isn't to say that I've felt this way because of China or Japan; I don't want to blame society. I simply feel like I'll be an outsider wherever I go. That's why home for me isn't defined as a place; rather it’s where the people I can be myself with are. My definition is centred on people.

In Japan, I've felt like an outsider ever since I was young. After coming to Tokyo, we moved to Ibaraki Prefecture when I was five because of my dad's work. I lived there for four years until I was around nine. My name was "Zhengyan" (禎妍) back then, and whenever I introduced myself at primary school, everyone would immediately realise: "Oh, she's not Japanese." I didn't think my name was cute, and those characters didn't compose a name that would be accepted in Japanese society.

I didn't mind this at all during nursery. When I entered primary school and started to understand the world, I became more self-conscious about how my name was different, how people asked me to repeat my name when I introduced myself, and how people giggled when they heard my name. I was humiliated. It was really difficult feeling humiliated about the very first thing you mention when you introduce yourself. You know how you have to introduce yourself every time you change classes for the new academic year? I still remember how I hated that time of the year. So when my parents' job took us back to Tokyo, I changed my name to "Yoshimi" (禎み). We thought it was a good timing given the change of environment. This has been one of the most significant events in my life.

I changed my name to "Yoshimi" so I could assimilate better into Japanese society, but my surname was still "Li". When I told my full name to people, they'd be like, "Oh, you're not Japanese." But because my first name is "Yoshimi", they'd say, "Are you hafu [‘half’: Japanese word used to refer to mixed-race people]?" Even though I was young, I thought this was great progress. While I couldn't assimilate into Japanese society completely, it was a step forward to being accepted. Looking back, it's a very sad way of thinking about it. I changed my name, but the feeling of being an outsider didn't go away. Between primary school and high school, I struggled with how to assimilate, how to fit in.

Whenever I went back to China, I was treated as if I was Japanese. Even though I was young, I struggled with this inconsistency. This happened about 14 years ago, but there's an incident I still remember to this day. Everyone in China accepted me because my name is considered to be 'normal' there. But one time a group of kids from the neighbourhood called me rìběn guǐzi (日本鬼子), which means something like a "Japanese brat". My parents' house in China is in a rural area, so people have old-fashioned values. They remember the Sino-Japanese War and have lived through times when China-Japan relations were worse than now. So they used the word that was from the wartime once they knew that I was from Japan. They were not being malicious at all. They were saying it as a joke. But what's burned into my memory is how the 10-year-old me desperately tried to fight back by saying, in Mandarin, "You're wrong, I'm not Japanese, I'm Chinese." But in Japan, I was trying my best to assimilate by saying, "I'm not Chinese, I'm Japanese." It was around that time that I started to feel like I couldn't be myself anywhere.

English was the only way for me to free myself from the sense of stagnation that I'd plunged into during junior high school and high school. I worked very hard to learn English during that period in my life. It's a way to connect to the outside world, you know? I had never experienced other places outside of Japan apart from China, so my encounter with English was an encounter with the outside world. I had been going back to China about twice a year since primary school so I always had some contact with the world outside of Japan, but English felt new for someone like me who lived as an outsider even in that outside world that I had a connection to. I thought maybe I could go to a world—somewhere different—where I wouldn't be an outsider. Driven by desperation, I put all my heart into studying English.

The year abroad I spent at Tsinghua University in Beijing was a turning point in my life. With a diverse group of exchange students from all over the world, it was the first international environment that I experienced. The shared understanding that formed the basis for all communication in the community of exchange students was that everyone is different. There was no pressure to conform or any kind of judgement that I'd felt in Japan. It was so freeing, and I felt a huge mental burden lifted off me during that year. I was having lots of fun in Japan and was fortunate to have great friends, but I realised that I had unconsciously been feeling under pressure. For my entire life, I had been trying to assimilate into society. The fact that there was a community full of people who accepted me as who I was, without me having to assimilate, was a total shock. I think people like that are what I would call a home.

「出身はどこですか?」と聞かれたら、私はいつも「複雑なんだよね」と話し始める。今は東京に住んでいるけど、中国で生まれて、家族は朝鮮人。いわゆる朝鮮族—中国のコリアンマイノリティ—で、たしか両親の2、3世代前が朝鮮半島から中国に移住して、中国に住み着いた。私の家族も中国に住んでいたんだけど、お父さんは東大で修士号を取るために日本に来た。私は中国で生まれて、そのときお父さんは日本にいたから、2歳半までは中国でおじいちゃんとおばあちゃんに育てられた。お父さんの大学院生活が落ち着いた頃に両親に引き取られて、そこからずっと東京に住んでいる。

逆説的だと思うんだけど、「ホーム」という言葉を聞くと、空を飛んでいる鳥が思い浮かぶ。帰る場所がある鳥。でも、帰る場所というのは土地ではなくて、ひとに帰るっていう意味なんだよね。ひとが、帰る目的地としてある。自分らしくあれるひと。私にとってのホームは、場所では定義できない。

私が考えるホームには、温かみがある。でも、その温かみは、地縁的な繋がりからもたらされるものだとは思わない。私にとって、例えば親戚のところに行くことは、感覚として冒険に出るほうが近い。ほとんどの親戚は中国にいるんだけど、そもそも言葉も通じないから、遠い存在なのね。私の両親世代だと、日常会話は中国語ではなくて朝鮮語が中心。私は、朝鮮語はとっくの昔に忘れているから、親戚とはコミュニケーションがとれない。中国語で話そうと思えばできるんだけど、親戚の集まりではみんな朝鮮語を使っているから、私はアウトサイダーになる。全く知らない文化、風俗に触れているような感覚で、なんなら文化人類学者の気分。観察していておもしろい発見もある。

中国のことをホームだと思わないし、日本のこともホームだと思わない。中国も日本も、どちらも好き。でも、自分はどちらにも完全には属していない。今まで住んだことがある社会の中で私は常にアウトサイダーだったから、自分らしくあれていたわけではない。でもこれは、中国だからそう感じたとか、日本だからそう感じたとか、社会を責めたいわけではない。単純に、自分はどこに行ってもアウトサイダーなんだろうなという気がする。だから、私にとってのホームは、土地で定義されるものではなくて、自分の素をさらけ出せるひとがいるところ。ひと基準の定義になる。

日本社会では、ずっと昔からアウトサイダーだなという気はしていた。東京に来たあと、5歳のときにお父さんの仕事の都合で茨城に引っ越して、9歳くらいまでの4年間は茨城に住んでいたの。それまで通っていた小学校では「禎妍」(テイゲン)という名前で、自己紹介をすると一瞬で「あ、日本人じゃないんだ」とバレていた。全然かわいくないし、日本社会で名前として受け入れられる文字列ではなかった。

幼稚園のときは何も気にしなかったけど、小学生になって物心ついてくると、自分の名前が他の人と違うこととか、自己紹介をするたびに聞き返されたり、クスクス笑われることを意識するようになって、ものすごく恥ずかしく思うようになった。名前は自己紹介するときに最初に出すものだから、それに対して恥を覚えるというのは、かなりきつかったんだよね。新学期になってクラス替えをするたびにクラスの前で自己紹介しないといけないじゃん。あの時間が超嫌いだったの!今でも覚えている。そこで、たまたま両親の仕事の都合で東京に戻ることになって、環境が変わるタイミングに合わせて名前を「禎み」(よしみ)に変えたの。これが大きなライフイベントになった。

もう少し日本社会に溶け込めるように名前を「禎み」にしたのに、結局苗字は「李」のままだから、フルネームで自己紹介すると「あ、日本人じゃないですね」となるわけ。でも、下の名前が「禎み」だから、「ハーフですか?」という反応に変わったの。幼いながら、それが私の中で大きな前進だった。この社会に完全には溶け込めていないけど、一歩認めてもらえた、と。今振り返ると、すごく悲しい考えなんだけど。それでもやっぱり自分の中でアウトサイダーであるという意識は消えなくて、どうやって溶け込んでいくか、どうやって馴染んでいくかというのに苦しんでいたのが小学校から高校までの学生時代だった。

中国に帰ると、そこはそこで日本人として扱われて、小さいながらにギャップに苦しんだ。もう14年前くらい前の出来事なんだけど、今でも覚えているエピソードがある。中国では普通の名前だからみんな何も気にせずに私を受け入れる。でも、「日本鬼子」—「日本の悪ガキ」みたいな意味—と近所の子どもたちに呼ばれたことがあった。両親の実家は中国の田舎にあるので、価値観は古い。周りの人たちは日中戦争を覚えていて、日中関係が今より悪かったときを生きてきた人たちだから、日本から来た人とわかると「日本鬼子」という、戦時中の言葉を使った。彼らに悪意はなくて、冗談として言っているだけなんだけど。10歳くらいの私が、必死に「違うよ、私は日本人じゃない、中国人なの」と中国語で言い返している瞬間が脳裏に焼き付いている。でも、日本では「私は中国人じゃない、日本人だ」と言って頑張っていた。そのときから、どこにも溶け込めないなというのは感じていた。

そんな中、中高時代に陥っていた、アウトサイダーとしての閉塞感みたいなところから抜け出す唯一の手かがりが英語だった。中高の英語の勉強をものすごく頑張った。外と繋がれる機会になるじゃない。中国を除いては海外経験がなかったから、英語との出会いが外の世界との出会いだった。小学校のときから2年に一回くらい中国に帰ってたから、日本の外との接点は常にあったんだけど、繋がりのある外の世界でも私はまだアウトサイダーだったから、英語は新鮮だった。別の世界、自分がアウトサイダーにならなくて済むような世界に行けるんじゃないかと。それで、藁にもすがるような思いで必死に英語勉強した。

中国・北京にある清華大学への留学は、人生のターニングポイントだった。世界中からいろんな人が集まっていて、初めて経験したインターナショナルな環境だった。特に、留学生のコミュニティ内におけるコミュニケーションの前提としてあったのが、人はそれぞれみんな違うということ。同調圧力とか、日本で感じるようなジャッジメントが一切なかった。そこから解き放たれて過ごした1年間がすごく精神的に楽だったの。日本は本当に楽しかったし、友達には恵まれていたんだけど、意識しないところでそういうプレッシャーを感じていたんだなというのに気づいたのが、清華大学で留学生コミュニティにいたときの1年間。今まで社会に馴染もうとして努力し続けてきた人生だったから、こんなに馴染んだりせずに、ありのままに受け入れてくれる人が集まっているコミュニティがあるんだっていうのが衝撃的だった。そういうところが、私にとってのホームなんだろうね。